1979 Fastnet Race: Equinoctial?

The 1979 race started on 11 August. BBC Radio shipping forecast, broadcast at 13:55 that day predicted “south-westerly winds, force four to five increasing to force six to seven for a time.”[3] By 13 August, winds were reported at Force 6, with gusts of Force 7. Forecasters were predicting winds of Force 8. The leading boat, Kialoa, trailed closely by Condor of Bermuda,[4] was on course to break the Fastnet record set eight years earlier.

Meteorological history

A large depression, known as “low Y,” formed over the Atlantic Ocean during the weekend of 11–12 August. On 13 August it began to intensify rapidly and turn northeastwards, reaching about 200 nautical miles southwest of Ireland. By the 14th, the low was centred over Wexford. Land-based weather stations reported gale-force winds, with the strongest winds out to sea over the race area. The Meteorological Office assessed the maximum winds as force 10 on the Beaufort scale; many race competitors believed the winds to have reached force 11.[1][5] Lowest pressure was 979 hPa.[6]

Something caught the best of British amateurs Ocean Yatchsmen in a disaster. I never understood how that could happen. Even the explanation won’t explain that. This is what I am looking at: 79_Fastnet Race

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The Spanish Main

The frequency of hurricanes in along any fifty mile segment of the Texas coast is
one about every six years. Annual probabilities of a strike along a fifty mile segment range from 31% at Sabine Pass to 41% around Matagorda Bay. The annual average occurrence of a tropical storm or hurricane per year is 0.8, or 3 per every 4 years.
Since 1829, the longest hurricane-free period for Texas was nearly 10 years: between October 1989 and August 1999. In contrast, one or more hurricanes affected the coast each year from 1885 to 1888. In 1886, four hurricanes struck the Texas coast with the first and last both hitting Sabine Pass. Since the sixteenth century, hurricanes and tropical storms have struck Texas  between 2 June and 5 November. This list does not include storms cross Mexico from the East Pacific Ocean.
There was no longer a Spanish Mainland on Continental North America driving across California to Texas. There were still tropical storms crossing Yucatan very early in the season but no records were kept for such in the 19th Century. Always assuming that Edison knew a lot more than he was prepared to admit about electricity, it is difficult to see that he could have done any more than box himself into a dead end in the development of alternators. And that even with magical attention from Tesla it is impossible to assume that the Huchison Effect was applied to weather  much before the 1970’sFlorence Olivia Manghut Helene Isaac Paul Barijat Joyce
Date: 07-16 SEP 2018
Hurricane-2 HELENE

HeleneADV  LAT    LON      TIME     WIND  PR  STATFlorence Olivia Manghut Helene Isaac Paul Barijat Joyce
    13.20  -18.60 09/07/18Z   30  1002 TD
    13.60  -18.50 09/08/00Z   35  1002 TS
    13.70  -19.60 09/08/06Z   40  1001 TS
    13.40  -20.60 09/08/12Z   40  1001 TS
    13.60  -21.70 09/08/18Z   50   998 TS
    13.20  -22.80 09/09/00Z   50   999 TS
    13.20  -24.00 09/09/06Z   55   997 TS
    13.20  -25.00 09/09/12Z   55   997 TS
   13.40  -26.00 09/09/18Z   65   992 Cat-1
   13.90  -27.20 09/10/00Z   75   984 Cat-1
   14.30  -28.90 09/10/06Z   75   984 Cat-1
   14.60  -30.00 09/10/12Z   90   974 Cat-2
   14.90  -31.50 09/10/18Z   90   974 Cat-2
   15.50  -32.40 09/11/00Z   95   968 Cat-2
   16.00  -33.60 09/11/06Z   95   968 Cat-2
   16.50  -34.30 09/11/12Z   95   966 Cat-2
   17.20  -34.90 09/11/18Z   90   968 Cat-2
   18.00  -35.40 09/12/00Z   85   973 Cat-2
   19.20  -35.70 09/12/06Z   80   977 Cat-1
   20.30  -36.50 09/12/12Z   80   977 Cat-1
   21.40  -36.70 09/12/18Z   75   980 Cat-1
   22.40  -36.90 09/13/00Z   70   983 Cat-1
   23.50  -37.30 09/13/06Z   65   986 Cat-1
   24.80  -37.30 09/13/12Z   60   989 TS
   26.30  -37.00 09/13/18Z   55   993 TS
   28.60  -36.50 09/14/00Z   55   992 TS
   30.60  -36.00 09/14/06Z   55   992 TS
   32.90  -36.30 09/14/12Z   60   988 TS
   34.10  -36.80 09/14/18Z   60   988 TS
   35.80  -35.80 09/15/00Z   60   988 TS
   37.70  -34.80 09/15/06Z   60   988 TS
   38.80  -34.00 09/15/12Z   60   988 TS
   40.20  -32.10 09/15/18Z   55   989 TS   
   41.20  -30.10 09/16/00Z   50   989 TS
   42.50  -28.40 09/16/06Z   45   993 TS

Equinoctial Storms

16 September 23:15 First Quarter
18 Tu 09:35 Declination 20.9° S
23 Su 01:54 Autumnal Equinox
25 Tu 02:53 Full Moon
Mid September “Stormy” 17 to 24 September  31/52=60%

20 Sep 2018: Fuego, Popocatépetl, Krakatau, Dukono, Reventador,…

WWIt is like The Watchers is getting their news from CNN. Lots of brown skinned people only warrant a brief mention.

21 Sep 2018: Ebeko

It is no coincidence that the North Atlantic shows us the elongations left over from a Tropical Storm with the Equinoctial special enough to be a singular eruption