An evil regime bites we hope

The dust to dust. …

A fellow worker of the vampire wife of the debauched treason worker Tory B Liar has written a book about some of the awfulness behind the Guantanamo terrorists and their victims.

He published it last year after gaining insights into the world of the worst regime since Pol Pot and China's gang of four and more.

He was given interviews by people he went on to condemn for their part in the abuse of prisoners and their illegal detentions.

This is what one USA journalist has written:

Originally posted by Jane Mayer:

Edited.

About a year ago, a book came out in England that made a fascinating prediction: at some point in the future, the author wrote, six top officials in the Bush Administration would get a tap on the shoulder announcing that they were being arrested on international charges of torture.

Philippe Sands is a law professor and a certified Queen's Counsel who works at the same law practice as Cherie Blair. His, "Torture Team," accuses the Bush Administration, of torture. Last weeks Spanish court took the first steps toward starting a criminal investigation of the same six former Bush Administration officials he had named,

Among those whom the court singled out was Feith, the former Under-Secretary of Defense for Policy, along with former Attorney General Alberto Gonzales; John Yoo, a former Justice Department lawyer; and David Addington, the chief of staff and the principal legal adviser to Vice-President Dick Cheney.

Sands' mother and her parents were Viennese Jews who barely survived the Holocaust; his mother spent the first seven years of her life in hiding, away from her family.

"It inculcated a burning sense of being aggrieved at wrongdoing, and at the failure of people to take responsibility for their actions," he said.

In 2004, when photographs of abused prisoners at Abu Ghraib surfaced, Sands read the protestations of innocence from Bush Administration officials, who blamed a few "bad apples".

"I could spot right away that they were speaking as advocates of a cause. So I decided to find out what really happened." He travelled to America to interview the key players in what he described as "a writing project I am engaged in on international law and the war on terror."

Many Bush officials agreed to meet with Sands, "I spent two years trekking around the country, finding out that they were manifestly untruthful," Sands said. "I've got a particular bugbear about lawyers," he added. "If not for lawyers, none of these abuses would have ever occurred."

He conferred with human-rights experts all over Europe on his findings. Word spread that he had the makings of a high-level war-crimes case. Gonzalo Boye, the Chilean-born Spanish lawyer who last week filed the criminal complaint against the Bush officials, said of Sands:

"Let me just say that he played a very big role in my thinking. His book showed me who the targets were."

It is hard to predict what will happen next, but, if arrest warrants are issued, the Obama Administration may be forced either to extradite the former officials or to start its own investigation. Sands reiterated a warning that he made in his book. "If I were they, "I would think carefully before setting foot outside the United States. They are now, and forever in the future, at risk of arrest. Until this is sorted out, they are in their own legal black hole."

The New Yorker.

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10 thoughts on “An evil regime bites we hope

  1. Barak Obama is not going to prosecute any torturers if they were only doing their job.Originally posted by Son of Evil Regime:

    "It would be unfair to prosecute dedicated men and women working to protect America for conduct that was sanctioned in advance by the Justice Department," Holder said.

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5imDvIlEBNgzKdqYgIuTUEzUEImrQD97JOUD82In which case why are the US and it allies the ones who so smugly hanged the workers for the third reich who were also only doing their jobs?

  2. Michael Moore pointed to this page in his website in reference to the war dead it is no longer illegal to lament:Originally posted by Robert Louis Stevenson.:

    XXI. RequiemUNDER the wide and starry skyDig the grave and let me lieGlad did I live and gladly dieAnd I laid me down with a will. This be the verse you grave for me:Here he lies where he longed to beHome is the sailor, home from seaAnd the hunter home from the hill.

    It's a lie! They said: "Fall down dead, we'll bury you where you lay." And the bombs and shouts as the light goes out and everywhere turned red mark your final home twixt kingdom come and your judgement day.Women first then the kids they nursed makes 85%. Who mourns them and 15% men? Only 15? Innocent? How smart those bombs for Iraq tombs? Home from the hunter's hill? With what contempt did they preempt revenge and anger still?

  3. Philippe Sands is a good scholar and a nice man. I once wrote to him about internship opportunities and he wrote back very quickly and warmly.

  4. Sadly the US constitution is not written to cover the President or his successor from failing to crack down on evil. Mr Sands is just another howling wolf.Being nice is one thing but wolves seldom swallow lumps of chimpanzee. Consider:Originally posted by New York Times:

    To read the four newly released memos on prisoner interrogation written by George W. Bush’s Justice Department is to take a journey into depravity. Their language is the precise bureaucratese favored by dungeon masters throughout history. They detail how to fashion a collar for slamming a prisoner against a wall, exactly how many days he can be kept without sleep (11), and what, specifically, he should be told before being locked in a box with an insect — all to stop just short of having a jury decide that these acts violate the laws against torture and abusive treatment of prisoners. In one of the more nauseating passages, Jay Bybee, then an assistant attorney general and now a federal judge, wrote admiringly about a contraption for waterboarding that would lurch a prisoner upright if he stopped breathing while water was poured over his face. He praised the Central Intelligence Agency for having doctors ready to perform an emergency tracheotomy if necessary. These memos are not an honest attempt to set the legal limits on interrogations, which was the authors’ statutory obligation. They were written to provide legal immunity for acts that are clearly illegal, immoral and a violation of this country’s most basic values. It sounds like the plot of a mob film, except the lawyers asking how much their clients can get away with are from the C.I.A. and the lawyers coaching them on how to commit the abuses are from the Justice Department. And it all played out with the blessing of the defense secretary, the attorney general, the intelligence director and, most likely, President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney. The Americans Civil Liberties Union deserves credit for suing for the memos’ release.

    Then again:

    President Obama deserves credit for overruling his own C.I.A. director and ordering that the memos be made public. It is hard to think of another case in which documents stamped “Top Secret” were released with hardly any deletions.

    I seems now, that President Obama is distancing himself from repercussion by allowing others to pursue the evil-doers

    But this cannot be the end of the scrutiny for these and other decisions by the Bush administration. Until Americans and their leaders fully understand the rules the Bush administration concocted to justify such abuses — and who set the rules and who approved them — there is no hope of fixing a profoundly broken system of justice and ensuring that that these acts are never repeated. The abuses and the dangers do not end with the torture memos. Americans still know far too little about President Bush’s decision to illegally eavesdrop on Americans a program that has since been given legal cover by the Congress. Last week, The Times reported that the nation’s intelligence agencies have been collecting private e-mail messages and phone calls of Americans on a scale that went beyond the broad limits established in legislation last year.Nobody really knows what any of the rules were.Bush never offered the slightest explanation of what he found lacking in the 1978 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act when he decided to ignore the law after 9/11 and ordered the warrantless wiretapping of Americans’ overseas calls and e-mail. He said he was president and could do what he wanted. The Bush administration also never explained how it interpreted laws that were later passed to expand the government’s powers to eavesdrop.

    But

    Obama administration argued in a recent court filing that everything associated with electronic eavesdropping, including what is allowed and what is not, is a state secret.We do not think Mr. Obama will violate Americans’ rights as Bush did. But if Americans do not know the rules, they cannot judge whether this government or any one that follows is abiding by the rules. In the case of detainee abuse, Obama assured C.I.A. operatives that they would not be prosecuted for actions that their superiors told them were legal. We have never been comfortable with the “only following orders” excuse, especially because Americans still do not know what was actually done or who was giving the orders. After all, as far as Mr. Bush’s lawyers were concerned, it was not really torture unless it involved breaking bones, burning flesh or pulling teeth. That, Mr. Bybee kept noting, was what the Libyan secret police did to one prisoner. The standard for American behavior should be a lot higher than that of the Libyan secret police. At least Mr. Obama is not following Mr. Bush’s example of showy trials for the small fry — like Lynndie England of Abu Ghraib notoriety. But he has an obligation to pursue what is clear evidence of a government policy sanctioning the torture and abuse of prisoners — in violation of international law and the Constitution. That investigation should start with the lawyers who wrote these sickening memos, including John Yoo, who now teaches law in California; Steven Bradbury, who was job-hunting when we last heard; and Mr. Bybee, who holds the lifetime seat on the federal appeals court that Mr. Bush rewarded him with. These memos make it clear that Mr. Bybee is unfit for a job that requires legal judgment and a respect for the Constitution. Congress should impeach him. And if the administration will not conduct a thorough investigation of these issues, then Congress has a constitutional duty to hold the executive branch accountable. If that means putting Donald Rumsfeld and Alberto Gonzales on the stand, even Dick Cheney, we are sure Americans can handle it. After eight years without transparency or accountability, Mr. Obama promised the American people both. His decision to release these memos was another sign of his commitment to transparency. We are waiting to see an equal commitment to accountability.

    Originally posted by U.S. Constitution, Article II, Section 4:

    "The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors."

    Don't get me wrong, the US is far better placed than the UK to set things straight. I wonder how things actually work in Britain sometimes.It is every bit as perfidious as legend has it.

  5. U.S. Constitution, Article II, Section 4:"The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason,Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors."Compare:

    with:

    The freedom of the masses is guaranteed by the masses. No-one else.The protestors aat the summiot were rounded up into a small section of the centre of London and contained in that section with no access to food, water or toilets.The US pastor had some level of choice. And remains alive. There are more third world activities of Britain's wonderful police farce online.

  6. I would not focus on domestic law so much. I would, like Sands and others, try to use applicable international law.

  7. Unfortunately international law has to start at someone's home. So far, one time US and UK allies, Spain has been making the right noises. But the labyrinthine moves that have to be made have to be meticulously observed.Softly softly catchie chimpee.Or not, as the case may be.It would be reassuring to know that in the background things are being assisted rather than hampered. But this all political shenanigans.

  8. Originally posted by Ali Soufan:

    One of the most striking parts of the memos is the false premises on which they are based.

    The first, dated August 2002, grants authorization to use harsh interrogation techniques on a high-ranking terrorist, Abu Zubaydah, on the grounds that previous methods hadn’t been working.

    The next three memos cite the successes of those methods as a justification for their continued use.

    It is inaccurate, however, to say that Abu Zubaydah had been uncooperative. Along with another F.B.I. agent, and with several C.I.A. officers present, I questioned him from March to June 2002, before the harsh techniques were introduced later in August. Under traditional interrogation methods, he provided us with important actionable intelligence.We discovered, for example, that Khalid Shaikh Mohammed was the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks. Abu Zubaydah also told us about Jose Padilla, the so-called dirty bomber.This experience fit what I had found throughout my counterterrorism career: traditional interrogation techniques are successful in identifying operatives, uncovering plots and saving lives. There was no actionable intelligence gained from using enhanced interrogation techniques on Abu Zubaydah that wasn’t, or couldn’t have been, gained from regular tactics. In addition, I saw that using these alternative methods on other terrorists backfired on more than a few occasions — all of which are still classified.The short sightedness behind the use of these techniques ignored the unreliability of the methods, the nature of the threat, the mentality and modus operandi of the terrorists, and due process.Defenders of these techniques have claimed that they got Abu Zubaydah to give up information leading to the capture of Ramzi bin al-Shibh, a top aide to Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, and Mr. Padilla.This is false.The information that led to Mr. Shibh’s capture came primarily from a different terrorist operative who was interviewed using traditional methods.As for Mr. Padilla, the dates just don’t add up: the harsh techniques were approved in the memo of August 2002, Mr. Padilla had been arrested that May. One of the worst consequences of the use of these harsh techniques was that it reintroduced the so-called Chinese wall between the C.I.A. and F.B.I., similar to the communications obstacles that prevented us from working together to stop the 9/11 attacks.Because the bureau would not employ these problematic techniques, our agents who knew the most about the terrorists could have no part in the investigation. An F.B.I. colleague of mine who knew more about Khalid Shaikh Mohammed than anyone in the government was not allowed to speak to him.It was the right decision to release these memos, as we need the truth to come out. This should not be a partisan matter, because it is in our national security interest to regain our position as the world’s foremost defenders of human rights.Just as important, releasing these memos enables us to begin the tricky process of finally bringing these terrorists to justice.The debate after the release of these memos has centered on whether C.I.A. officials should be prosecuted for their role in harsh interrogation techniques.That would be a mistake.Almost all the agency officials I worked with on these issues were good people[????] who felt as I did about the use of enhanced techniques: it is un-American, ineffective and harmful to our national security. [So why did good people do it?]Fortunately for me, after I objected to the enhanced techniques, the message came through from Pat D’Amuro, an F.B.I. assistant director, that “we don’t do that,” and I was pulled out of the interrogations by the F.B.I. director, Robert Mueller (this was documented in the report released last year by the Justice Department’s inspector general). My C.I.A. colleagues who balked at the techniques, on the other hand, were instructed to continue. (It’s worth noting that when reading between the lines of the newly released memos, it seems clear that it was contractors, not C.I.A. officers, who requested the use of these techniques.)As we move forward, it’s important to not allow the torture issue to harm the reputation, and thus the effectiveness, of the C.I.A.[has this compromiser taken leave of his senses?]The agency is essential to our national security.[That's debateable]We must ensure that the mistakes behind the use of these techniques are never repeated. We’re making a good start:President Obama has limited interrogation techniques to the guidelines set in the Army Field Manual..Leon Panetta, the C.I.A. director, says he has banned the use of contractors and secret overseas prisons for terrorism suspects (the so-called black sites).[And closed the stable doors and swept up the spilt milk?]Just as important, we need to ensure that no new mistakes are made in the process of moving forward —a real danger right now.

    Ali Soufan was an F.B.I. supervisory special agent from 1997 to 2005.http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/23/opinion/23soufan.html?_r=4&ref=opinion

  9. Originally posted by Ali Soufan:

    One of the most striking parts of the memos is the false premises on which they are based.

    The first, dated August 2002, grants authorization to use harsh interrogation techniques on a high-ranking terrorist, Abu Zubaydah, on the grounds that previous methods hadn't been working.

    The next three memos cite the successes of those methods as a justification for their continued use.

    It is inaccurate, however, to say that Abu Zubaydah had been uncooperative. Along with another F.B.I. agent, and with several C.I.A. officers present, I questioned him from March to June 2002, before the harsh techniques were introduced later in August. Under traditional interrogation methods, he provided us with important actionable intelligence.We discovered, for example, that Khalid Shaikh Mohammed was the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks. Abu Zubaydah also told us about Jose Padilla, the so-called dirty bomber.This experience fit what I had found throughout my counter-terrorism career: traditional interrogation techniques are successful in identifying operatives, uncovering plots and saving lives. There was no actionable intelligence gained from using enhanced interrogation techniques on Abu Zubaydah that wasn’t, or couldn’t have been, gained from regular tactics. In addition, I saw that using these alternative methods on other terrorists backfired on more than a few occasions — all of which are still classified.The short sightedness behind the use of these techniques ignored the unreliability of the methods, the nature of the threat, the mentality and modus operandi of the terrorists, and due process.Defenders of these techniques have claimed that they got Abu Zubaydah to give up information leading to the capture of Ramzi bin al-Shibh, a top aide to Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, and Mr. Padilla.This is false.The information that led to Mr. Shibh’s capture came primarily from a different terrorist operative who was interviewed using traditional methods.As for Mr. Padilla, the dates just don’t add up: the harsh techniques were approved in the memo of August 2002, Mr. Padilla had been arrested that May. One of the worst consequences of the use of these harsh techniques was that it reintroduced the so-called Chinese wall between the C.I.A. and F.B.I., similar to the communications obstacles that prevented us from working together to stop the 9/11 attacks.Because the bureau would not employ these problematic techniques, our agents who knew the most about the terrorists could have no part in the investigation. An F.B.I. colleague of mine who knew more about Khalid Shaikh Mohammed than anyone in the government was not allowed to speak to him.It was the right decision to release these memos, as we need the truth to come out. This should not be a partisan matter, because it is in our national security interest to regain our position as the world’s foremost defenders of human rights.Just as important, releasing these memos enables us to begin the tricky process of finally bringing these terrorists to justice.The debate after the release of these memos has centered on whether C.I.A. officials should be prosecuted for their role in harsh interrogation techniques.That would be a mistake.Almost all the agency officials I worked with on these issues were good people

    [????]

    who felt as I did about the use of enhanced techniques: it is un-American, ineffective and harmful to our national security.

    [So why did good people do it?]

    Fortunately for me, after I objected to the enhanced techniques, the message came through from Pat D’Amuro, an F.B.I. assistant director, that “we don’t do that,” and I was pulled out of the interrogations by the F.B.I. director, Robert Mueller (this was documented in the report released last year by the Justice Department’s inspector general). My C.I.A. colleagues who balked at the techniques, on the other hand, were instructed to continue. (It’s worth noting that when reading between the lines of the newly released memos, it seems clear that it was contractors, not C.I.A. officers, who requested the use of these techniques.)As we move forward, it’s important to not allow the torture issue to harm the reputation, and thus the effectiveness, of the C.I.A.

    [has this compromiser taken leave of his senses?]

    The agency is essential to our national security.

    [That's debatable]

    We must ensure that the mistakes behind the use of these techniques are never repeated. We’re making a good start:President Obama has limited interrogation techniques to the guidelines set in the Army Field Manual..Leon Panetta, the C.I.A. director, says he has banned the use of contractors and secret overseas prisons for terrorism suspects (the so-called black sites).

    [And closed the stable doors and swept up the spilt milk, carefully putting it back in the baby's bottle?]

    Just as important, we need to ensure that no new mistakes are made in the process of moving forward —a real danger right now.

    Ali Soufan was an F.B.I. supervisory special agent from 1997 to 2005.http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/23/opinion/23soufan.html?_r=4&ref=opinion

  10. Originally posted by UK Press Association:

    A close friend of former weapons inspector David Kelly wrote to the Attorney General calling for an independent review into his death, according to reports.US Air Force officer Mai Pedersen's intervention came after Attorney General Dominic Grieve indicated that he was "concerned" about the Kelly case and interested in exploring how to take the matter forward.No inquest was ever completed into the death of Dr Kelly in 2003, just days after he was identified as the source of stories questioning then prime minister Tony Blair's case for war in Iraq.But the Hutton Inquiry into his death found that he killed himself by swallowing 29 painkillers and slitting his left wrist.Ms Pedersen, who worked with Dr Kelly in Iraq in the 1990s and remained a close friend, challenged this finding in 2008, revealing that he had an injury to his right elbow which made it difficult for him to cut with a knife.Shortly before his death, he was unable to cut a steak when having dinner with her, she said. And she said that he had a dislike for pills which made it unlikely he would have chosen that method of ending his life.According to the Daily Mail, she wrote to Mr Grieve, saying: "We understand you have indicated a willingness to consider possibly re-opening the investigation into the continuing controversy into the death of Dr Kelly."Given the absence of any coroner's inquest and the perpetual secrecy surrounding the post-mortem examination, it is painfully obvious that this matter continues to cry out for a formal, independent and complete review. Ms Pederson fully supports and adds her voice to such an effort. The passage of time (does) not diminish either the public's interest or the Government's responsibility to ascertain the full truth, whatever that might be."The Attorney General's office was unable to confirm whether it had received a letter from Ms Pedersen. A spokesman repeated an earlier statement, saying: "The Attorney remains concerned about this issue and is keen to explore how the matter might be taken forward with ministerial colleagues."Mr Grieve has no power to order a new public inquiry, but could make an application to a coroner for an inquest if there is evidence to support it.

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