In the beginning there was light.

And it sent me spinning. …

I am far from being an expert on weather. It is just that I have taught myself about earth science and found I could not understand certain things. So rather than think I am inadequate I ploughed on with it thinking:

I may not be clever but I am not stupid. Maybe I can't understand some things because they are not correct.

So I left them alone and got on with other stuff and came back to it later and realised logic could show me where things are wrong.

Consider the attraction of gravity. It is about mass. So the greater the mass the greater the attraction. Therefore a lump of lead is more attractive to other mass than a lump of ice. And mountains filled with lead ore should be attracted to the moon much more readily than large amounts of water or tiny particles of hydrogen.

Once I got over that idea, that the earth will attract any particle in, on or near it 81 times more powerfully than the moon will, I was able to think more freely.

So how does the moon pull water in tides but no the sand on the sea shore? Sand is some 3 or 4 times more dense than water.

From that I got to understand the role the moon plays in our lives.

Also when I started doing it I was angry that insurance companies could use the term Acts of God. (Not that they do, you just insure yourself for whatever chances you wish to gamble on happening and they give the odds in terms of payments and premiums.

But a terrific earthquake in the 1990's killed a lot of people in Azerbaijan or somewhere and I wanted to show that it wasn't god's fault.
http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Azerbaijan+earthquake&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-ahttp://www.google.co.uk/search?q=+earthquake&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

All I had was a small local public library with Encyclopaedia Britannica and a couple of slightly larger ones a few miles further away with slightly different resources. One had Keesings Newspaper Archives and the other, a collection of Whitaker's Almanacs containing weather data for Britain and the lunar phases for the year each almanac came out.

Both larger ones also had microfiche files of newspapers. With the weather forecasts off them I was able to discern a certain phenomenon in the North Atlantic I thought applied to the weather when earthquakes were due.

(Bear in mind they were forecasts and prepared a long time before the printing run, which would be hours before the presses were released and the newspapers delivered.)

I was quite surprised when I finally got the Internet and found that people only wanted to abuse me for my ideas. I reacted quite badly to it as I was quite a nasty person in those days. I should have just ignored them but I had an awful lot to say and a lot more to learn.

Besides, most of the time my forecasts would go wrong leaving me in limbo, embarrassed, puzzled and very, very dejected.

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2 thoughts on “In the beginning there was light.

  1. Something in the air is connected to the behaviour of aircraft and people when there is an earthquake of large magnitude in a spell.For some reason even large airliners with all their safety features fall out of the sky if there is a 7.5 M. involved. I was looking for a Mag 7 last night on this site:http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsww/Maps/10/170_-20.phpNo sign of the Tongan 6.5 then though. Today it is in the news. Not really that big. Orders of magnitude require 5 times that to get to 7. They go up in 0.1 magnitude numbers. Beats me why.Anyway the feature is a convergence of several waves but not at the same time. If they had been within seconds of each other it might have been given a 8.6 rating or even more.Not that seismologists would agree with that. But I think these things are sonic not subduction.The airline that was lost yesterday with 188 passengers in the Atlantic between Rio de Janeiro and Paris would have been on the opposite side of the world to that.So you see that anything I'd have to say would be totally unacceptable by anyone with a spark of sense.But there is a lot to geo-physics we have yet to even discover, never mind consider. How about above cloud lightning? It is considered powerful enough to bring down an aeroplane. Suppose the befuddlement that comes with some types of weather is the type that is associated with ACL? Not that I know enough to more than suggest it.But I can suggest that the frequency of earthquakes at 10 hertz is of the level that does affect people. It makes us dozy and forgetful.Not that the airliner would have crashed due to pilot error. It has too many fail-safes -including two pilots and a computer control.Here are some more statistics:http://in.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idINIndia-40019020090601?pageNumber=1&virtualBrandChannel=0Gravitational tides: ~0 Hz to ~70 microHz (periods of 4+ hours)Earth's eigenvibrations: ~0.3 mHz to ~0.1 HzSurface wave analysis: ~2 mHz to ~2 HzRegional earthquakes: ~10 mHz to ~10 HzLocal earthquakes: ~10 mHz to ~400+ HzStrong motion: ~0.05 Hz to ~10 Hz (frequency band which usually causes structural damage during strong ground shaking)http://seismo.berkeley.edu/faq/instrument.htmlHow to make a simple seismometer: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20081102151834AAyTPIj

  2. Originally posted by Fred Kaplan:

    Every subculture, especially every bureaucratized subculture, has a set of unquestioned assumptions — bits of 'conventional wisdom', as John Kenneth Galbraith once called them. The key to preserving one's sanity and wisdom is not to fall prey to their assumptions.

    It is the same with modern science. The fact that jet aircraft were not flying in the 1930's comes down to the same thing. And it is the same with weather and earthquake predictions.We have been able to calculate with great precision the position of the moon since the 19th century. And not long afterwards a simple computing type machine (more like a bicycle gear system) was invented for forecasting the tides.Bt the 1970's a model of the solar system was made on computer that could run backwards for several centuries. And today you can find online thousands of years of lunar phases.http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/phase/phasecat.htmlBut we still can't get the maths to fit any theories about the way tides work.The simple fact is that though the moon has the chief function in them, tides are pretty much in the nature of clockwork, more given to the time of the day than the position of the moon.None the less explanations of what is going on, if you choose to look, rely on the positions of the sun, moon and earth on two heaps of water rising and falling around the globe as though the moon were pulling it away from the earth.The fact that this is obviously not what happens is written off as friction. As if friction has any effect on water.Much less does it have any effect on the air. Gasses have thousands of times less friction than near "perfect" liquids. And they can mix easily even with water as well as compress almost infinitely.And as for earthquakes being caused by layers of the earth moving over and under each other. Just stop and think will you, for goodness' sake.Earth doesn't stress and strain like steel or concrete. In fact even concrete wouldn't if it were not reinforced with steel. It would just break up with the least hydraulic pressure from too much rain or drought. And so will most large boulders.They have finite sizes at which they are stable. That is why ancient temples built of rock needed all those pillars and columns.As I say, think; why don't you!

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