The Queen’s Jubilee

Always supposing a lady likes to be told how old she is and that she isn't getting any younger nor that she is fast running out of options… …

Congratulation my dear.
You have been and still are, awesome.

Google are doing a bling thing on Robert Moog today (23rd May 2012) and he isn't alive to be pleased about out it or not. (He died a few years ago.)

What are they going to do for Her Madge?

The local library is putting on a display of stuff from the past.
The Coronation saw the entry-point of TV into Britain's mainstream.

Though few had them, parlours all over the country were packed with people watching the grainy images of a strictly non digital empire's last gleaming.

Soon after, everybody wanted one. TV was the iPod of my generation. Looking back on old videos of some of the greats in TV entertainment, I wonder what all the fuss was about.

In a glass case here are some artefacts laid on by the local museum. A ten shilling note and an old quid.

They are enormous sheets, 6 x 4 I think, by the look of the clunking green pound note. I remembered the ten bob as a pretty piece of paper but the one on show is as ugly as any European country's pre Euro script.

All coins in Britain bear the image of the present monarch. Decimalisation saw the others off and with them, an archive of our history.

When I was a boy you could find Victoria's impression in most change. It wasn't small change either. A penny was almost as large a coin as the mint made. 3 new old pennies weighed an ounce and there were 240 of them in a pound.

Imagine carrying a few bob in pennies around all day.

Men were men in those days -and often wore a belt and braces.
No wonder.

A man's belt was a piece of work too. Usually 2 inches wide and made of quite thick leather. They matched the style of tattoo men wore, strictly military brands. All the men I knew around the streets where I lived, carried images of lifebelts woven some sort of vegetation (I can't remember clearly) with the name of a ship or some patriotic legend.

If you lived near the sea in their generation, the chances were you knew enough about boats to have served in HM navy.

It really was a different world.
I can't say I'd like it back. I was too young to know the ropes, so I can't judge. How can anyone judge the past from so far away?

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5 thoughts on “The Queen’s Jubilee

  1. Originally posted by WL:

    Men were men in those days… […] I was too young to know the ropes, so I can't judge. How can anyone judge the past from so far away?

    Things are not always what they seem even for the children…Men were men in those days just for their belts… Huh?Anyways, good post, I like it.

  2. I meaant to look up images of coins and notes. Thanks for reminding me.It wasn't that mean wore extra-masculine clothing in those days but that they needed the style to do the jobs men did in those days.There were legal safeguards but little of the sort we have these days. Things were more like they are in China or India.The only protection they had were their guilds, their unions and their training. The rest was down to their own carefulness and of course, the clothing.There was a very sharp difference in one's working clothes and ones evening kit and more again for the Sunday service clothing.No central heating and few cars. Nobody had double glazing and in winter you wore a vest, a shirt, two jumpers and a coat.And sometimes, not often but occasionally, you kept your coat on indoors.It's probably hard for you to imagine winters without heating where you live in the tropics but in certain cycles winters saw off generations.

  3. Yes, really hard to imagine that measure of coldness. Indeed, I cannot understand how you can bear to live day after day over there but the same you could think about us… Nowadays it's much too much hot over here, frequently 32ยบ, a truly oven…I cannot image and nothing curious for experimenting that in my own skin. Only we're planning to enjoy cold weather during a week -in our next vacation- even climbing up more that 4.000 m to the Bolivar Peak, the highest peak of our hills.

  4. Well watch out for tornadoes on Monday. I was expecting something else but we have a hurricane developing, more or less the same as Alfredo did.

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