Your mileage will vary

On the other side of the mountain. …

Looking at the description of the Chinook winds on the previous thread has given us the perfect example of the differences you can expect when looking at a weather chart.

The town on the left of the mountain is having a wet time of things today. The village on the other side is enjoying a fine day. They are being fed their weather by the same winds.

The same things happen on larger scales. One part of the country is dry and the other is wet. Sometimes it is like that all the year around. Compare British Columbia with Arizona for example.

And sometimes it is planet wide too. Wet weather on the west of Britain seems to go hand in hand with wet weather in parts of Florida. meantime California and central Australia are having a drought.

Then when it stops raining here it starts putting the fires out in California and Australia.

That seems to happen time after time.

I call it the planet's harmonic.
You can watch the wave cross the ocean.
You can watch it cross the continent.

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12 thoughts on “Your mileage will vary

  1. When a Low leaves the continent North America, everywhere a certain distance frfom that Low is affected by it.Within a certain radius, it is the predominant cause of your weather.Wherever you live.Of course if there is another Low nearer you that will be the one to watch. But it will still be closely related.When a Low arives off the Hebrides in North West Scotland, half way down the land mass of the main island the weather will be perfectly nice.When it moves onto the mainland of Scotland (if that is the way it going) the west coast under it will be wet, on the east coast it will be dry. (That's the Foen Effect.)But obviously the effect has an "effect" a lot further away in the Irish Sea between Dublin and Liverpool.Exactly the same effect occurs in the Liverpool Bay when the Low is to the south off Biscay on the west coast of France. So that is what I mean by the harmonic.Everything weather related at any one moment is related to all the other parts.And at the same time, according to the spell parts of Florida are reacting to whatever Low just happens by some repeating coincidence so that it is wet or dry or whatever.Of course a lot depends on the season.There are all sorts of permutations. But most of them are very similar if not perfect matches.

  2. When a Low leaves the continent North America, everywhere a certain distance frfom that Low is affected by it.Within a certain radius, it is the predominant cause of your weather.Wherever you live.Of course if there is another Low nearer you that will be the one to watch. But it will still be closely related.When a Low arives off the Hebrides in North West Scotland, half way down the land mass of the main island the weather will be perfectly nice.When it moves onto the mainland of Scotland (if that is the way it going) the west coast under it will be wet, on the east coast it will be dry. (That's the Foen Effect.)But obviously the effect has an "effect" a lot further away in the Irish Sea between Dublin and Liverpool.Exactly the same effect occurs in the Liverpool Bay when the Low is to the south off Biscay on the west coast of France. So that is what I mean by the harmonic.Everything weather related at any one moment is related to all the other parts.And at the same time, according to the spell parts of Florida are reacting to whatever Low just happens by some repeating coincidence so that it is wet or dry or whatever.Of course a lot depends on the season.There are all sorts of permutations. But most of them are very similar if not perfect matches.

  3. Fronts.When they are put on a map, they are there to tell you what to make of all the isobars.Of course oncew you know where the Lows and the Highs are likely to go, you don't need them.You may remember the film The Matrix. When the character Neo is being told about the meaning of the numbers running down the computer screen, he is told by the crew man showing him the ropes that he sees people not numbers.I imagine with the experience senior meteorological officers have, when they look at the data coming in from weather stations, they see the fronts.What happens is the data is released in a list of numbers and letters that mean temperature and barometer reading and water levels in the measuring equipment.All sorts of stuff like that.All the barometer reading are turned into isobars connecting weather stations having the same reading. Wind speeds and directions are given as flags. F shapes. (¬) means the wind is blowing from west to east at 5 knots. A longer flag means 10 knots a short and a long flag (F) means the wind is blowing north at 15 knots. More bars mean more speed.I haven't got any more keyboard characters to show other examples.The temperatures are given as fronts.There are only two types. Warm and cold fronts.There are versions of warm and cold, for instance ending weather fronts and new weather fronts. These are shown as dotted or broken lines.I usually ignore all that.All except the mixed cold and warm fronts that is.They are the ones that look like cartoon mice.Lots of them mean earthquakes or/and all sorts of exceptional phenomena.That's about all there is to charts as far as I am concerned.All the rest is a matter of what causes it all.We don't know.We can watch sequences though.And we already know what to expect in their seasons.

  4. I trying to take it in,need to read a couple a couple more times and research definitions.Earth Harmonics..I would like to hear the earth. I bet by earthquake, size, depth,duration, you could do a good representaion.My weather checks consist of radar, water vapor, sometimes lake wave height.Water vapor gifs, are pretty cool, I am trying to be able to listen to chimes about the place for both direction and speed. Insanity huh. One day, I'll have a weather station, a real one, with a camera, and video log…:left: :right: :whistle: :coffee:

  5. Fronts.When they are put on a map, they are there to tell you what to make of all the isobars.Of course oncew you know where the Lows and the Highs are likely to go, you don't need them.You may remember the film The Matrix. When the character Neo is being told about the meaning of the numbers running down the computer screen, he is told by the crew man showing him the ropes that he sees people not numbers.I imagine with the experience senior meteorological officers have, when they look at the data coming in from weather stations, they see the fronts.What happens is the data is released in a list of numbers and letters that mean temperature and barometer reading and water levels in the measuring equipment.All sorts of stuff like that.All the barometer reading are turned into isobars connecting weather stations having the same reading. Wind speeds and directions are given as flags. F shapes. (¬) means the wind is blowing from west to east at 5 knots. A longer flag means 10 knots a short and a long flag (F) means the wind is blowing north at 15 knots. More bars mean more speed.I haven't got any more keyboard characters to show other examples.The temperatures are given as fronts.There are only two types. Warm and cold fronts.There are versions of warm and cold, for instance ending weather fronts and new weather fronts. These are shown as dotted or broken lines.I usually ignore all that.All except the mixed cold and warm fronts that is.They are the ones that look like cartoon mice.Lots of them mean earthquakes or/and all sorts of exceptional phenomena.That's about all there is to charts as far as I am concerned.All the rest is a matter of what causes it all.We don't know.We can watch sequences though.And we already know what to expect in their seasons.

  6. The definitions of fronts are to be found on the MetOffice's site:http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/weather/uk/guide/key.html#pressureI can't honestly recommend the British met Office site for anything other than the North Atlantic charts. It is being run by the people they promoted from the gang that was not responsible for not co-ordinating the rendition flights from Paisley Airport in Scotland that never really happened.Here is something I have been neglecting:http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151004746614169&set=a.169775739168.113995.166805519168&type=1&theaterI had assumed I would be able to follow the stuff after the event but of course they are not housing an archive.It appears in the age of Facebook things like that are no longer necessary.I can remember when people posted blogs about stuff like this and posted links to video on places like You Tube.Not any more.What a crock of **** everything seems to be at the moment.

  7. Is there a place for overlays of pressure charts and lets say radar, or humidity..etc?I saved the link for reference,thank you.

  8. om the Wikipedia:April 8, 1998. Jefferson County, Alabama. 32 Killed. April 16, 1998. Lawrence County, Tennessee. 3 Killed. May 3, 1999. Bridge Creek – Moore, Oklahoma. 36 Killed. June 22, 2007. Elie, Manitoba (assessed by Environment Canada) 0 Killed.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_F5_and_EF5_tornadoesThis is about how far I can get archive of the North Atlantic chart…Forget it. I would expect better from the Germans if they were not relying on the MetOffice:http://www.wetterzentrale.de/topkarten/fsfaxsem.html

  9. Originally posted by Unasia:

    Is there a place for overlays of pressure charts and lets say radar, or humidity..etc?

    I have no idea.I have only just thought to look on a search engine for reports of tornadoes.I was quite surprised at some of them.Canada has a good resource. A lot depends on what the locals tie into internationally though.Originally posted by Wikipedia:

    2012May 22, A late afternoon F0 tornado touched down in a field east of Orono, Ontario. It dissipated quickly, and no injuries or damage was reported.May 25, Two low-level tornadoes were confirmed in rural areas northwest of Montreal, Quebec. An F0 was the first to touch down near the town of Brownsburg-Chatham around 8pm, followed by an F1 that swept through the Saint-Benoît sector of Mirabel. Both tornadoes caused extensive damage estimated to be in the millions. No one was injured.May 29, A confirmed F0 tornado touched down east of Ottawa, in the small community of Bourget. The tornado was short lived and caused minor roof damage and uprooted trees.June 5, At least one confirmed tornado touched down 9 km south of Taber, Alberta, knocking out power in parts of the town. At least 3 others were reported near Turin, Brooks, and Bow Island.June 8, An F1 tornado touched down in Huntingdon, Quebec, severely damaging a gas station and uprooting trees.June 15, 8 tornadoes were confirmed in Saskatchewan near the communities of Plover Lake, Biggar and Wilkie. There were several reports of funnel clouds throughout the evening. No damage was reported.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Canadian_tornadoes_and_tornado_outbreaksI might even replace the NWS reports I am using with this stuff from Wikipedia.The last time I used The Tornado Project, all it was doing was correlating the NWS reports. It has now moved to larger databases:http://www.tornadoproject.com/Handy but copyrighted.

  10. The dark bands of rain shown in the Antarctic charts are on here:http://my.opera.com/Weatherlawyer/albums/showpic.dml?album=12101912&picture=157928402Some of the warnings I posted to usenet:***A massive change in the set up that has surrounded Antarctica appearsthis week.With only one set of charts to work on of course and with such a longrange covered, it is difficult to be sure, to be sure, to be sure.But a move from the field-coil like cladding of a dynamo back to theamplitude of a stator plate means the storm generator is back inbusiness.And just take a look at what the Aussies think will occur on Friday:> http://www.bom.gov.au/australia/charts/viewer/index.shtml?type=mslp-p…(The dark clouds on Thursday will be tornadic, I think. From the MetOcharts they look to be grounded in the sky.) http://groups.google.com/group/sci.geo.earthquakes/browse_frm/thread/a0991863ff81a5b6#***On Jun 7, 9:27 am, Weatherlawyer <weatherlaw…@gmail.com> wrote:> > How do I tell them about the major resurgence in the Pacific?> > No..> > Wait…> > Or is it tornadoes?> I seem to have hit a wall however, the North Atlantic is still showing> a blocked Low for the rest of this spell.I don't know what it is but there is something spectacular brewing onthe west of the Dateline from Friday evening tomorrow:> http://www.bom.gov.au/australia/charts/viewer/index.shtml?type=mslp-p… T+ 42. From Midnight tonight it looks like a tropical storm but that is not how it develops.Also there is a stron L shape on the Peninsula. I forgotten which handis which but that is either tornadoes or Tropical storms again.There is some odd stuff evolving there. It is worth paying attentionto. I can't say there is much in the way of earthquakes, thoughsomething on the coast at the 60th longitude East might resemble that,late Sunday. http://groups.google.com/group/sci.geo.earthquakes/browse_frm/thread/0fb59c7474b7e92c#***> I don't know what to make of this present thing (Number 5 >http://www.tropicalstormrisk.com/) except that it will grow larger> when the system over Western Europe gets set up properly (T+36 through> to +84 on the North Atlantic here >http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/weather/uk/surface_pressure.html)> That's cyclogenesis Thursday noon to cyclosis Saturday noon as far as> the chart goes / can be trusted.> Since there are three days to go thereafter, it could circle back on> itself into the North or Norwegian Sea. That could extend the life of> the Topical storm -or give it another name.It is slated to remain a Cat 1 by the 18th that means still on the mapon the 19th:14 Jun, 0:00. 12 hrs 55 kts TS14 Jun, 12:00. 24 hrs 65 kts Cat 115 Jun, 0:00. 36 hrs 70 kts Cat 115 Jun, 12:00. 48 hrs 75 kts Cat 1Note how the degree of certainty jumps from here. For which seehydraulic jumps. Or butterfly effect.16 Jun, 12:00. 72 hrs 85 kts Cat 217 Jun, 12:00. 96 hrs 85 kts Cat 218 Jun, 12:00 120 hrs 80 kts Cat 1http://groups.google.com/group/sci.geo.earthquakes/browse_frm/thread/bc436b1d96ad1301#***Blowing your own trumpet means you tend to get carried away by the noise you are making. You know what you want it to sound like and you may be doing your best…But it still only amounts to noise if you are as honest as anyone listening.What I have attempted to show is not my success but that there is something in the charts that gets ruled out of any following-up.And that even though they obviously occurred on dates that were interesting, they did not forecast the times correctly.I have my own (strident) beliefs why that is.What will matter is that one day someone who actually knows how to play a trumpet will come along and get the tune I thought I was listening to all these years earlier.I hope they won't be afraid of ditching my theories. Theories just get in the way of facts most of the time.Perhaps that is the only important thing I have learned in all this?

  11. I looked up "extreme weather" once I saw the first long run of the anomalies in the Antarctic charts I compiled just now. These were just two of some absolutley stunning photos that it turned up.Supercells are rare.On the 6th of June the BOM charts threw up the anomalies in charts T+ 6 to 120. That is the model runs showed anomalies I could not explain or had not seen before for 6 to 120 hours forecast.The next day much the same appeared on the run for that day out from 54 to 78 hours.What they were showing was that something unusual had joined the data from somewhere. That's all.The Super-tornadoes were not the only things going on. Obviously it is early days. Like I said; I hadn't seen these things before. I did have some idea what the meant of course.And said so. But I am not god.

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