How I am collecting charts

Why I am collecting?
Obviously because I am a "bit odd". …

From the first screenshot you can see that my files are in folders sorted by the month of whatever year:

I put the number of the month in front so that when I look at the folder for the year, they are arranged in the right order. If I don't do that, the months will be arranged in alphabetical order.

Next the folder holding the model runs is named after the date of the lunar spell.

That makes it easier to look up if I ever find a suitable matching time of phase. A full moon say in June at the same time as a new moon in July, even if they are in different years, ought to produce much the same weather… overall.

It may be out of sequence and the storms will likely hit different regions but overall, it will say what type of show the sky will be putting on.

From the next two images, you can see I have created a folder for the day:


This will store all the charts for that day. And you can see I have renamed the charts accordingly:

On their original websites the charts are named for the hour. The day is usually implicit in the context:

So all the charts have the date for example:
"29 September 2012."
showing on them as so.

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4 thoughts on “How I am collecting charts

  1. OK now what charts.I am collecting a different set of charts from a few months back:This one is still on the cards:http://www.tropicalstormrisk.com/And this of course is a prime one:http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/weather/uk/surface_pressure.htmlThis one is a red hot certainty:http://www.bom.gov.au/australia/charts/viewer/index.shtml?type=mslp-precip&tz=UTC&area=SH&model=G&chartSubmit=Refresh+ViewAnd these are a pair of perennials:http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsww/Quakes/quakes_big.phphttp://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsww/Quakes/quakes_all.phpThere's a world of wonder in here:http://www.opc.ncep.noaa.gov/However these two are off the charts:http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/map/images/ens/mslp_nh_alltimes.htmlhttp://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/map/images/ens/mslp_sh_alltimes.htmlThey are OK as far as they go provided you don't go too far with them. They become ridiculous after some of the hydro-pneumatic jumps they compute.These two on the other hand are good looking. Not that I look at the first:http://polarmet.osu.edu/nwp/animation.php?model=arctic_wrf&run=12&var=plot005And this one is excellent, except for the problem inherent in combining two data sets in one chart:http://polarmet.osu.edu/nwp/animation.php?model=arctic_wrf&run=12&var=plot001Well that's it fore now. I wrote to some agencies that are pioneering research on the polar regions for better charts.Still waiting…Ho hum!

  2. To be honest about the above; I only put the links in there so I can find them when I am messing around with my different hard drives.Isn't t'net wonderful?One couldn't really imagine the all encompassing tool it has become in such a very short lifetime, can one?If you had access to other computers, not all that long ago, you would have to carry all the links and cross reference stuff with you on a disc. A 3 1/4 inch square of magnetic storage, very liable to decomposure. (Or whatever the term is.)And the format would be extremely non cross platform.So. Now I have to explain their use.

  3. Originally posted by Weatherlawyer:

    So. Now I have to explain their use.

    To be continue.. Where? Got a link, please!

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