Whatever Next?

 

I can’t recall when I last saw such a run of charts nor what happened next with them, so I am not even going to attempt to say what is going on here:

 

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First of all a description of the colours. They represent water content in the air; rain fog or snow -whatever. It is all taking place at sea level though so consider it out-fall. But bear in mind with the region that some of it is subtropical whilst other parts are polar and the physics of the atmosphere may be far from what you would be used to in mid latitudes of the northern hemisphere.

 

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The black discs are cyclones and the colour is due to both their water content and the compression of isobars (the thin black lines all round the maps.)

 

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The outermost isobar is the 1016 millibar line outside of which and almost off the map is the region of the tropics called the doldrums. All tropical storms start in regions of this middle pressure range in the northern hemisphere the 1016 line runs all over the weather charts passing between the Highs (marked here as H would you believe?) and the Lows (L(for the hard of reading.))

 

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The yellow lines are lines of Longitude and the yellow circles are lines of latitude. The lines of latitude are all parallel and vary in length from the equator (all 25000 miles of it not shown) to the South Pole (which is no miles long.)

 

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There is an inner division between the High pressure areas and the low ones. One of them is the 1008 millibar line (slightly thicker than the other isobar lines drawn on these charts) and the 1024 line similarly drawn and denote the Highs (mostly (obviously.))

 

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The large yellow patches denote South America (bottom left) Africa (top left) and Australia (http://www.bom.gov.au/australia/charts/viewer/index.shtml?type=mslp-precip&tz=UTC&area=SH&model=G&chartSubmit=Refresh+View)

 

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The behaviour of the isobars has a lot to do with more than the weather. That long strip of isobars running down the right hand side of Antarctica (yellow, middle, sorry) and keeping parallel to the continent, indicated a region of calm mirrored elsewhere in the planet and indicating the likelihood of a build up of no pressure in the tropics – (a depression or super-cyclone called a tropical storm.)

 

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The 994 millibar line in that strip goes around the inner or “extra tropical” cyclones on these charts. In the northern hemisphere there is an easily observed distinction between Tropical Storms and depressions and the ones most of us are familiar with the extra tropical variety. To start with ours are bigger. These aren’t.

 

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Almost all the isobars in here are extra tropical. the first complete line of latitude is 20 degrees south and the tropic of Capricorn lies 2 1/2 degrees inside that. And everything inside that is extra tropical. In the northern hemisphere it is told that the differences in the temperatures to the north of the extra tropical cyclones compared to the temperatures to the south of them are the forces or energy suppliers that allow our cyclones to rotate.

That obviously isn’t happening here. (Temperatures to the north are warmer for a start.) Not that any of the above concerns the following except to provide the setting:

 

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That line of parallel isobars has now reached Cape Horn at the southern end of South America and its passage through is constricted. (or at least, that is what it looks like for what happens next is that a huge cyclone builds at the mouth of the River Plate.) If you look at the following chart (t+066) you will have missed it.

 

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It occurred in the top chart (t+006, valid 18:00 12 April 2014.)

 

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Almost all the water coming in from the tropics comes in from the left hand or eastern side of the continents surrounding Antarctica. There is a semi-permanent cyclone in the South Pacific on the bottom right that comes in from the islands off the map. It blends in with the cold air compressed up against the mountains along the coast of Antarctica and is shelled out in layers along the coast of the Pacific.

 

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What usually happens then is that the parallel isobars situation can spread all along the coast of Antarctica until the tropical storms work themselves out. (which of course they never do.) This continuum is the Ouroboros. And it is the Phoenix -the original Ring of Fire.

 

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Following such a large influx from South America and added to by the cyclones off Africa, an huge cyclone tends to build up south of Australia. The one in the chart above is centred on the Southern Magnetic Pole. just off MacQuarie Island -a place given to occasional large earthquakes. And not so occasionally, bloody big storms.

That one isn’t nearly as big as the one at 70 south 100 west though.

 

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Now there’s three of them -almost. Multiple cored cyclones. Cyclones and anticyclones avoid each other like plagues which seem to do nothing like avoiding anything like a plague would do by definition but still I am no meteorologist.

(Well, I am really but at least I am not a scientist.)

 

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This all looks very angry to me.

Lots of cyclones of not too great a magnitude?

And what about the gap forming between them and coast?

 

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All over?

 

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Or not, as the case may be?

All this is taking place just after a super-quake, two large earthquakes and a large cyclone (off Australia.)

 

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Is that what they call a bomb in New Zealand?

Or the reason they named the capital Wellington?

 

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When such large systems grow, it immediately stops the movement of Anticyclones.

Or do they just shrink from a common cause?

 

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Sometimes they get trapped and entrained in the cyclones like air bubbles in shaken water.

 

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But they don’t mix any more easily.

 

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And eventually things begin to return to normal.

 

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Or not, as the case may be.

But what is normal?

 

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And what is going to happen with those three cyclones south of Australia?

Stay tuned.

 

 

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